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Latest From the Blog

“A Life Well Played” documentary screening and live performance

Please join us on Sunday, June 25th, 2017, for a screening of the documentary A Life Well Played, plus I’ll be performing a set of music with Matt Senjem, Micheal Bissonnette and Gregg Inhofer.

Click here for tickets.
Click here to view the A Life Well Played trailer.
Click here for more details.

A Life Well Played Screening & Playlist: UPDATE

As of now, this is the projected song list. The theater does have a Steinway, so Gregg will play that instrument. A nice plus of playing at this hall.

The set list is mainly my own music. I do include Nuages, by Django Reinhardt just because he is so essential to my history and I am identified as one of his many descendants. My Girl is included because it was in my first set list at 12 years old and I still have followers who like to hear me sing a couple of songs.

Bohemian Flats and Chrysanthemum are new pieces of mine which will be played for the first time live.

As I said before, Matt and Michael have been my main partners for years. Gregg and I have been friends for longer than Matt has been alive, and Gregg and I have played on many recordings together. This show however will be the first time Gregg and I play a live gig together.

The Set for June 25th, 2017:
1) Through Rose Colored Glasses (solo guitar)
2) Butterfly (trio start here)
3) Beatnik Pie
4) July (vocal)
5) Nuages
6) East Side
7) Sans Souci
8) Astoria
9) Mary
10) Silesian Mist
11) Rococo (quartet Gregg start)
12) Chrysanthemum
13) Bohemian Flats
14) Up Town
15) My Girl (vocal)

Hope you’ll stop by and enjoy the show and live music. If you haven’t bought your ticket yet, you can click here.

A Lifelong Love of Music

My mother was a very keen music fan. Even in my pre-school years I remember listening to her records with her on her tiny Hi-Fi set. She collected 45 RPM 7 inch singles. In those days the “singles” had picture sleeves which added to the fascination for me. Her favorites were Hank Williams (Senior, that is, not his less talented offspring) and The Everly Brothers.
I developed a sort of record buying fixation and I would convince her to purchase a new record every week. This was a big thrill to me. We would walk down to Red Owl each week and I would scour their small record rack. Red Owl was a grocery chain but the store two blocks from our house had magazines and records as well.
I got my first guitar at the age of six and this interest in recorded music only intensified.
I so wanted to make records that I would ask my mother to write my name on the label of a record (one I was less fond of) just to see what my name would look like on a recording.
My career choice was thus made at a very tender age. This is probably unadvisable but my passion was pretty intense and those embers still have some glow left.
I have since made and played on many records including 45s, LPs, cassettes, CDs and MP3’s.

Maurice Utrillo (1883-1955)

I am currently reading a great deal about Maurice Utrillo (1883-1955).

Utrillo was a self taught painter born in the Montmartre quarter of Paris. His mother was the artist Suzanne Valadon. She studied with Degas and Renoir and is said that she was never quite sure who was the father of Maurice. She finally attributed the paternity to a lesser known Spanish artist Miguel Utrillo though he probably wasn’t the father either.

Maurice was a troubled soul his entire life and had a strong predilection for drink. In later life he became very religious and married an older woman after his mother died and he himself was 52. His mother took care of him for many years and after her death he sought a mother figure again in his older wife Lucy Valore.

Utrillo’s paintings are many and mostly street scenes of Montmartre. After 1910, his work which had previously been derided as “primitive” attracted critical attention. In 1928 the French government awarded him the Cross of the Legion d’honneur.

Until the end of his life however, he was interned in mental asylums repeatedly.

These days his paintings are worth hundreds of thousands of dollars.
C’est la vie.

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