Vermeer

(Composed and performed by Reynold D. Philipsek
2015 copyright Zino-Rephi Music BMI)

17th-century Dutch painter Johannes Vermeer had such an effect on me that in my early thirties, I decided to go to art school part-time to learn how to paint with oils.

After two years, I realized that as a painter, I was merely an enthusiastic hobbyist but I’m glad I learned how to draw and the process of painting with oils.

This piece is my appreciation of Vermeer. It begins and ends with a musical canon (like a “round” the same music begins at different times to create counterpoint).

Because Vermeer was such a master of form and balance I thought that the inclusion of a canon was the right touch to precede and follow the improv section. 

Take care and be safe. 

Link here: https://youtu.be/Pu0q5DvorH4

Carel Fabritius (1622-1654)

In my pursuits as an autodidact I find that one discovery leads to another and that this rather circuitous path never seems to end. So the more I search the more I “discover.”

For instance, my intense interest in the Dutch painter Johannes Vermeer (1632-1675) led to my stumbling upon Carel Fabritius. Fabritius came slightly before Vermeer and both were painters from Delft. In fact, many think Vermeer was strongly influenced by Fabritius even though Fabritius left few paintings.

The cover of my limited edition CD called “Rara Avis” has a painting by Carel Fabritius called “The Goldfinch.” This painting again appears on the inside of the “Quintessence” package, It is considered to be one of his handful of masterpieces and this painting of quiet perfection fits the title “Rara Avis” perfectly.

Fabritius was only 32 years old when he was killed in the tragic munitions explosion in Delft on October 12, 1654. The only biography of Vermeer I know of begins with the Delft explosion and some biographical background on Delft and Carel Fabritius.

Somehow all of this information and the works of various artists that catch my interest influence me. As always, I am drawn to those artists who endeavor to express what Maurice Ravel called “life’s mysterious thrill.”

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