Reverie

Reverie
written and performed by Reynold Philipsek

John Mc Laughlin is a composer and guitarist I admire very much. Mc Laughlin is a little over ten years older than myself and is someone that I only admire more as time goes on. His playing and composing gets better with time and his prolific energy is amazing. Either his daily meditation or his idyllic home in Monaco accounts for his continued productivity. His records just keep getting better. Mr. Mc Laughlin insists that the writing of music cannot be forced. Either it comes freely or it doesn’t come. This has been my experience as well. Still, the need to create something new persists whether the inspiration flows or not. At such times I peruse my back catalog of music. Although I have written at least 233 pieces or songs (according to the BMG listings) only about 30 of my original compositions are active at any one time in my live performance repertoire.

Recently I resurrected a piece of mine written in 2006 called “Reverie.”

“Reverie” appeared on the first East Side album. While I like that version well enough I have always had the nagging feeling that the tempo was a little slow. I have always enjoyed improvising on the chord changes of this piece and I had also recently found some new ways to approach that angle as well. Since I am looking to refresh my original song list for the many summer gigs I have coming up, the idea of redressing Reverie has become a priority. As usual I demo a tune first. This is the updated concept of Reverie. Reverie is one of three tunes I wrote under the influence of Astor Piazzolla. Like the other two tango-oriented songs I wrote (“Astoria” and “Tango Blue”) “Reverie” makes liberal use of the 3-3-2 rhythm of Nuevo Tango.

To listen to the new demo of this track, click here.

Hiatus Week 3: Poor Hidalgo

At week three of my hiatus in the sun I have come up with a short guitar piece that I think is quite nice.

The working title is “Poor Hidalgo.”

I have been thinking about the Don Quixote character a lot and it led to this tune which utilizes as a unifying them the Spanish dance pattern called “Quajira” which alternates 6/8 and 3/4 meters.
According to wiki the definition of “hidalgo” is:

“In literature the hidalgo is usually portrayed as a noble who has lost nearly all of his family’s wealth but still held on to the privileges and honours of the nobility. The prototypical fictional hidalgo is Don Quixote, who was given the sobriquet ‘the Ingenious Hidalgo’ by his creator, Miguel de Cervantes. In the novel Cervantes has Don Quixote satirically present himself as an hidalgo de sangre and aspire to live the life of a knight-errant despite the fact that his economic position does not allow him to truly do so.[15] Don Quixote’s possessions allowed to him a meager life devoted to his reading obsession, yet his concept of honour led him to emulate the knights-errant. The picaresque novel Lazarillo features an hidalgo so poor that he spreads on his clothes breadcrumbs from a box to simulate that he has had a meal. His hidalgo honour forbids him from manual work but does not provide him with subsistence.”

~Reyn

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